It is also sometimes known as velvet sumac. Staghorn sumac (also spelled sumach) is the most common of three species that grow in Ontario. In-depth wild edible PDFs. Flower clusters are up to 20 centimeters (ca. In fact, it is most often encountered in roadside ditches and at the edges of farm fields. Both grow 10 to 15 feet tall with a similar width and have bright red fall colors. See more ideas about Sumac, Plants, Shrubs. The leaflets are narrowed or rounded at the base and sharply It is found from New England south to Georgia west to Michigan, Iowa, Missouri and Mississippi. Rhus typhina L. Anacardiaceae (Cashew family) Life cycle. Staghorn sumac, also called vinegar sumac, is a short tree that grows in a roundish shape. Acta Entomologica Sinica, 50(12):1309-1314. Zachary Huang, Michigan State University. Tree of Heaven is an invasive and extremely aggressive in growth and proliferation. North shore of Lake Superior east to Nova Scotia. But the non-poisonous sumac, also known as Staghorn sumac, is safe to pick. Easily recognized by the fuzzy deep red fruit clusters at the tip of long branches. Its forked branches are covered with furry rust-red colored hairs, much like a stag’s antlers. 8 inches) long and 5 to 10 centimeters (2 to 4 inches) across (see photo). The leafy stems are furry. It is a species of prairies and other grasslands, old fields, roadsides, savannas and woodlands, and fencerows. Staghorn sumac has been introduced from regions to our east and north, but although it may persist in locations, it is not considered invasive. Winged sumac can be distinguished from poison sumac by its 9–23 leaflets and red berries. Plant staghorn sumac trees in the margins of swamps, streams or woodlands. Leaves. It has alternate, compound leaves, 16 to 24 inches long. “This plant is a cultivar of a species that is native to the Chicago Region according to Swink and Wilhelm's Plants of the Chicago Region, with updates made according to current research. US Forest Service, FM-RM-VE Staghorn sumac trees range from 15 to 25 feet in height and 20 to 30 feet in width. Leaflets are lance-shaped to narrowly oblong with a pointed tip, 2 to 5 inches long with coarsely toothed margins. Foliage – deciduous Flowering – June to August. Both plants can grow together and may be difficult to tell apart. It does become brittle with time, but that is the case to a lesser degree with redwood and cedar as well. There’s nothing like a tasty plant that just loves to grow in just about anywhere, it’s a forager’s dream. The leaflets are dark green and smooth above, and pale beneath, except along the midrib. to keep it up with flowers if I were to write on … #115784761 - Red berries with lots of hairs on a staghorn sumac tree, Rhus.. Latin name: Rhus typhina L. French name: Sumac vinaigrier; Synonym(s): Velvet sumac Taxonomic Serial Number ... Associated species. Plant staghorn sumac trees in the margins of swamps, streams or woodlands. Few trees can grow in such degraded soil like this tree can. Commonly found on field edges, roadsides and forest borders. Some wild plants are poisonous or can have serious adverse health effects. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) grows just about anywhere and everywhere all across the eastern part of the United States. These trees are sometimes confused because of similar compound leaf shape and occurrence in the same disturbed habitats. 1996. The fruits are sometimes soaked in water to make a tart, somewhat lemony drink. It is 43 rd on the Best Browse List. Identification, health, Each cluster of drupes can contain anywhere from 100 to 700 seeds. Staghorn Sumac is a member of the Anacardiaceae, the Sumac or Cashew family. Rhus typhina L. Anacardiaceae (Cashew family) Life cycle. Tree of Heaven is a favored host of Spotted Lantern Fly, Lycorma delicatula. It is found from New England south to Georgia west to Michigan, Iowa, Missouri and Mississippi. Staghorn Sumac is a wide-spreading large shrub developing a flat-topped appearance. North Dakota tree handbook. Rhus typhina is the largest of the North American sumacs, an open, spreading shrub (sometimes a small tree), earning the common name staghorn sumac because of the reddish-brown hairs covering the branches as velvet covers the antlers of deer. Photo by David Taylor. AND. Scientific Name: Rhus spp. The most widespread sumac — staghorn sumac — is non-poisonous. native to Canada down through the United States; zone 4 ; Habit and Form. Similar Images . Look for double rows of leaves on each stem. The foliage of large, pinnate, bright-green leaves, 24 in. Rhus glabra (smooth sumac) can be distinguished from staghorn sumac by the lack of hairs on its stems and petioles. See more ideas about Specimen trees, Sumac, Plants. Rhus copallina (dwarf sumac) is similar in appearance to R. typhina, except its stems have raised dots and its leaflets have smooth edges. Branches display U-shaped leaf scars in winter. 10 inches) diameter. • The berries can be steeped to make tea. It is native to woodland edges, roadsides, railroad embankments and stream/swamp margins from Quebec to Ontario to Minnesota south to Georgia, Indiana and Iowa. Staghorn sumac gets its name from its thick, velvety upper branches, which resemble the antlers of young male deer. Beginners at plant identification can easily confuse poison sumac and non-rash-causing types of sumac such as staghorn sumac.Indeed, the plants are related. Tree Size: 30-40 ft (10-12 m) tall, 6-12 in (15-30 cm) trunk diameter. Species of economic importance or medical concern found in the family include cashew (Anacardium occidentale), mango (Mangifera indica), pistachio (Pistacia vera), poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), and Pacific poison oak (Toxicodendron diversilobium). They can be easily distinguished at any time of year by leaves, twigs, bark, and fruit. It has large shiny dark-green pinnate leaves, each with 9 to 27 leaflets arranged in a fern-like pattern. I’ve shared how I make sumac lemonade in a previous post, and this recipe is a variation on the theme. Small tree with flowers. Each flower is about 5mm (1/4") across, consisting of 5 spreading petals, a calyx with 5 lobes, 5 stamens, and a central pistil. USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. This species flowers in June to July depending on the part of the country in which it is found. Staghorn sumac is native to the eastern parts of Canada and the U.S. By late summer it has beautiful autumn-coloured foliage and the fruit is a brilliant crimson red. Sumac species are avoided by some gardeners for a couple of reasons. Staghorn sumac has alternate, compound leaves, 40 to 60 cm (16 to 24") long. Bees, wasps, and beetles are strongly attracted to the flowers. Rhus typhina range map. Michigan Honey Plants: Staghorn sumac. The leaflets are dark green and smooth above, and pale beneath, except along the midrib. List of key staghorn tree facts. The most popular sumacs for landscape use are winged, staghorn, and smooth sumac, either the native wild species or specially-bred cultivated varieties such as the golden leaf “Tiger Eye” sumac. Since staghorn sumac and black walnut are common and often found growing in similar areas as Tree-of-Heaven, we will focus on these two native look-alikes. a large open shrub or weedy tree; flat-topped crown; colonizes and suckers; 15' to 25' tall; spread si difficult to determine because it colonizes; coarse texture; fast growth rate; Numerous lacey leaf cultivars exist. There about 150 species of sumac worldwide and 14 species native to the United States. are invasive, but most species are not. Staghorn sumac – Rhus typhina. But there are couple of safety issues to consider. The two species that I’ve observed most commonly around the Ohio River Valley are R. typhina (staghorn sumac) and R. copallina (winged or shining sumac), but once you develop an eye for this genus they’re all very easy to spot.Many bear very close resemblance to the staghorn. Habitat. Sharing a genus with poison sumac (Rhus vernix) has unnecessarily blackballed staghorn sumac (R. typhina) from inclusion in many landscape plans. Close up of flowers. Liu YL, 2002. This is not the case as I have found pieces laying on the ground exposed to the elements for 10 years, and only the sapwood has rotted. • The berries are high in vitamin C and are useful for colds, fever and scurvy. We are not health professionals, medical doctors, nor are we nutritionists. However, on close inspections of stems, buds, fruit pods and trunk, you can tell the difference. staghorn sumac This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in … Alternate, pinnately compound with nine to 31 leaflets approaching 24 inches long. Wild food can help treat various medical conditions. It is one of the last plants to leaf out in the spring with bright green leaves that change to an attractive yellow, orange, and scarlet in fall. Tree of Heaven is an invasive and extremely aggressive in growth and proliferation. Leaflets are narrowed or rounded at the base and sharply pointed at the tip with finely serrated edges. Human connections : Historically, sumac species were used by Native Americans for a variety of medicinal purposes — to control vomiting and fever, treat scurvy, and as a poultice for skin ailments. Toxicodendron (the Poison ivy, Poison oak, Poison sumac family.) It is a species of prairies and other grasslands, old fields, roadsides, savannas and woodlands, and fencerows. Photo by David Taylor. To support our efforts please browse our store (books with medicinal info, etc.). Anacardiaceae Family: Staghorn sumac is a U.S. native, deciduous, large shrub to small tree that can attain a height of 30-35 feet. This is an open, spreading shrub (sometimes a small tree) that typically grows 15-25’ tall. Li ZX; Sun XG; Li QH; Guo HL, 2007. The fruit has a citrusy yet sour flavour that is best enjoyed as a beverage. The other two are smooth sumac (R. glabra) and fragrant sumac (R. aromatica). Staghorn Sumac, which is not toxic to humans and is the best species for sumac lemonade, grows as a bush/tree like structure. 3 to 33 feet) tall, usually tree-like, but in thickets, and occasionally shrubby. List of key staghorn tree facts. 1400 Independence Ave., SW The large clustered seed pods attract a variety of wildlife into the winter months. It is up to the reader to verify nutritional information and health benefits with qualified professionals for all edible plants listed in this web site. Similar Images . Average Dried Weight: 33 lbs/ft 3 (530 kg/m 3) Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC):.45, .53. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Administration, Bismarck. Smooth sumac (Rhus glabra) and staghorn sumac (R. typhina) are the most common and readily available landscape species. However, the flowers can really help if you want to keep (Sumac… The fruiting head is a compact cluster of round, red, hairy fruits called drupes. Add to Likebox #132199688 - Fragment of the Rhus typhina bush, also known as sumac with bright.. Without attention, it can become weedy. staghorn sumac Anacardiaceae Rhus typhina L. symbol: RHTY Leaf: Alternate, pinnately compound, 16 to 24 inches long, with 11 to 31 lanceolate leaflets with serrate margins each 2 to 5 inches long, rachis fuzzy; green above and paler below. Flower: Species is usually dioecious; small, with yellow-green petals, borne on upright, dense terminal cluster up to 8 inches long, appearing in mid-summer. Oct 2, 2016 - Unusual to see as a specimen tree. Photo by David Taylor. The trunks are generally between 5 and 10 cm (2 to 4”) wide, but some have been recorded with diameters as great at 38 cm (15”). Twigs are stout, densely red hairy and 16 to 20 millimeters (5/8 to 3/4 inches) thick (see photo). Staghorn sumac (rhus typhina) identification video : Plants To Know: Staghorn Sumac EverydayTacticalVids : About Published on Aug 14, 2014. nutrition, recipes, history, uses & more! First, be sure of your identification before you remove the sumac shrubs in question. staghorn sumac Anacardiaceae Rhus typhina L. symbol: RHTY Leaf: Alternate, pinnately compound, 16 to 24 inches long, with 11 to 31 lanceolate leaflets with serrate margins each 2 to 5 inches long, rachis fuzzy; green above and paler below. They can be easily distinguished at any time of year by leaves, twigs, bark, and fruit. A Staghorn sumac or velvet sumac ,Rhus typhina bush showing the red fruits, alternate, pinnately compound leaves, and velvet covering of new branches Autumn colored Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina), Divonne les bains, France. It is native to woodland edges, roadsides, railroad embankments and stream/swamp margins from Quebec to Ontario to Minnesota south to Georgia, Indiana and Iowa. Other common regional names include red sumac, scarlet sumac, common sumac, and western sumac. Each stem usually has between 6 and 12 leaves, plus an additional single leaf at the end. Staghorn Sumac also can form large colonies from aggressive root suckers, something too many homeowners have discovered after buying one of the horticultural varieties offered in the garden trade. Multiple branched shrub with large compound leaves turning a rainbow of colors early in the fall. (Rhus typhina) Distribution: Northeastern United States. Staghorn sumac, also called vinegar sumac, is a short tree that grows in a roundish shape. 4 to 7 inches) wide. Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina) is a small tree with branches that spread to make a small rounded crown. Many of them believe sumac plants (Rhus spp.) Caterpillars of many moths and butterflies eat the foliage. Moreover, they both are tall shrubs (sometimes reaching about 30 feet tall), deciduous, and native to eastern North America. While we strive to be 100% accurate, it is solely up to the reader to ensure proper plant identification. Staghorn Sumac also can form large colonies from aggressive root suckers, something too many homeowners have discovered after buying one of the horticultural varieties offered in the garden trade. Can grow to a height of 20 ft at maturity. Leaves. However, the big difference is that the poison sumac has clusters of grayish white berries that hang down, and it tends to grow exclusively in low, wet, or flooded areas such as swamps. Please click here for more information. The ones around me are approximately 10-20 feet tall. The bush is a member of the Anacardiaceae or Cashew family, and is a native to eastern North America. Bark is typically smooth and dark brown. A hardiness zone is a geographically defined area where a given plant is capable of growing. Both plants can grow together and may be difficult to tell apart. As you can see, like Tree-of-Heaven, the leaves are also pinnately compound with a central stem, or rachis. It is named for its branches which resemble the velvety antlers of a deer. Compact clusters of greenish-yellow flowers bloom from June to July. Staghorn sumac … Typical habitats include open fields, roadsides, fence rows, and parkland. But, the easiest way to identify is to look for the staghorn’s unique flower/fruiting structure: Height – 16 feet (5 m) Exposure – full sun Soil – ordinary. Staghorn Sumac is a native to Ohio and a great naturalizer plant. Even then, poison sumac is not a common species. This is an open, spreading shrub (sometimes a small tree) that typically grows 15-25’ tall. Colony-forming shrub to small tree. Oct 29, 2016 - Explore Theresa Rooney's board "Staghorn Sumac" on Pinterest. Trees, insects and diseases of Canada's forests Trees. Another common wildlife food genus, related to sumac. There is no reason to put forth the expense and effort if you have a stand of staghorn sumac, rather than the toxicodendron variety. In: Soil and Water Conservation in China. Tree of Heaven vs Staghorn Sumac. I always find Staghorn Sumac as having very low rot resistance. Staghorn sumac makes a lovely, vitamin-C-rich beverage sometimes called Indian lemonade. (Although on average they are about half that.) It is very similar to the more desireable staghorn sumac, but it has smooth rather than velvety bark. The dense conical clusters of crimson, hairy fruits on the female plant are most decorative at the end of the year. Canadian Species . Click. Anacardiaceae (the Cashew or Sumac family) Rhus (the Cashew or Sumac genus). Staghorn sumac grows in an open form that can grow up to 7 metres (25') tall and can be as equally wide. Its open habit and hairy stems resemble horns on a male deer, giving staghorn sumac its name.