Webster helpfully gives Latin examples for the grammatical uses. It is above them and not contrary to them. Another example is in an advertisement for a transport company: "We go a long way for you." Specialized figures have been defined to distinguish zeugmas with particular characteristics such as the following figures, which relate to the specific type and location of the governing word: A diazeugma[20] The… [3] Then, it is not necessary for the governing phrase to relate to two other parts of the sentence. It is the world's leading software suite for perfecting written English. We recommend using Grammarly. (, "What a shame is this, that neither hope of reward, nor feare of reproch, This page was last edited on 14 September 2020, at 20:18. document.write(new Date().getFullYear()); (, "We shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty." Here are some differences according to wikipedia. Two figures of speech Zeugma and Syllepsis are discussed with suitable examples. Zeugma is any case where a single mention of a word is treated as a part of more than one clause of a sentence. The zeugma figures are of two types: those in which the governing word is the main verb (in which case these are subsequently categorized according to the position of that governing verb), and those in which the governing word is another part of speech … You could say zeugma is joined with syllepsis. In context|rhetoric|lang=en terms the difference between syllepsis and zeugma is that syllepsis is (rhetoric) a figure of speech in which one word simultaneously modifies two or more other words such that the modification must be understood differently with respect to each modified word; often causing … is a zeugma whose governing word occurs in the middle of the sentence and governs clauses on either side. He lists, that is, three things that might be "put out", but to put out washing is to hang it on the clothesline in the sun, whereas to put out the fire is to douse it with water, … As nouns the difference between pun and zeugma is that pun is a joke or type of wordplay in which similar senses or sounds of two words or phrases, or different senses of the same word, are deliberately confused while zeugma is (rhetoric) the act of using a word, particularly an adjective or verb, to apply to more than one noun when its sense is appropriate to only one. and Conners, Robert J. ", is: "Okay, there we go / Only thing we have on is the radio." "Like syllepsis, the figure known as zeugma uses a single word to link two thoughts, but in syllepsis the relationship of the linking word to both ideas is correct, whereas in zeugma the relationship is correct for one idea but not for the other. Zeugma amongst many other words is derived from the Greek language meaning “bonding”. A zeugma is a type of clause in which a single verb or noun is used to govern several parts within it. The type of figure is grammatically correct but creates its effect by seeming, at first hearing, to be incorrect by its exploiting multiple shades of meaning in a single word or phrase. "You held your breath and the door for me" is a zeugma that is a syllepsis, because "held" is used to mean two, incompatible, things. You are beautiful both inside and out. Like zeugma, syllepsis also employs the technique of using a single verb for more than one part in a sentence, but where that single verb applies grammatically and logically to only one. (rhetoric)The act of using a word, particularly an adjective or verb, to apply to more than one noun when its sense is appropriate to only one. Zeugma which is often also called syllepsis, or semantic syllepsis, is a construction where a single word is used with two other parts of a sentence but must be understood differently in relation to each. As a verb pun is to beat; strike with … There is a particular type of zeugma referred to as a syllepsis that uses a single governing noun or verb that adopts different meanings based on the other phrases. One I remember from school is: Both "he bolted the door" and "he bolted his lunch" are syntactically and semantically correct, but the meaning of the verb "bolt" is different in the tw… The sentence consists of three parallel clauses, called parallel because each has the same word order: subject, verb, object. (, "They covered themselves with dust and glory." Rex Parker Does the NYT Crossword Puzzle. [5][6][7][8] Example: "He took his hat and his leave." 2. When the meaning of a verb varies for the nouns following it, there is a standard order for the nouns: the noun first takes the most prototypical or literal meaning of the verb and is followed by the noun or nouns taking the less prototypical or more figurative verb meanings. Match. 1963 July, Fred Sommers, Types and Ontology, in The Philosophical Review, Volume LXXII, Bobbs-Merril… Most people chose this as the best definition of zeugma: The definition of a zeugm... See the dictionary meaning, pronunciation, and sentence examples. All rights reserved | This template is made by Colorlib. By definition, grammatical syllepsis will often be grammatically "incorrect" according to traditional grammatical rules. [16], The opposite process, in which the first noun expresses a figurative meaning and the second a more literal meaning, tends to create a comic effect: “and she feeds me love and tenderness and macaroons.” (The Stampeders, “Sweet City Woman”), The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms offers a much broader definition for zeugma by defining it as any case of parallelism and ellipsis working together so that a single word governs two or more other parts of a sentence.[17]. Zeugma and syllepsis are closely related, and these days zeugma is the general term used to cover both. Syllepsis (also called zeugma), a stylistic device consisting of the union of disparate terms in a common syntactic or semantic unit. Corbett, Edward P.J. "a yoking together"[1]) and syllepsis (/sɪˈlɛpsɪs/; from the Ancient Greek σύλληψις, sullēpsis, lit. Faith indeed tells what the senses do not tell, but not the contrary of what they see. This type of figure is not grammatically incorrect, but creates its effect by seeming at first hearing to be incorrect, by exploiting multiple shades of meaning in a single word or phrase. Example: "He took his hat and his leave." A mesozeugma whose common term is a verb is called "conjunction" (coniunctio) in the Roman Rhetorica ad Herennium. And how can idioms help you become a fluent speaker? (rhetoric) Syllepsis. I think syllepsis is just the Latin word for zeugma. However, such solecisms are sometimes not errors but intentional constructions in which the rules of grammar are bent by necessity or for stylistic effect. [21], This article is about the rhetorical concept. More on Zeugma and syllepsis on wikipedia. I had a burrito; my wife, tacos. For example, in the sentence, “They saw lots of thunder and lightning : 14. syllepsis definition: (in grammar or rhetoric ) the use of a single sentence construction in which a verb , | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and …